Event Detail


TME Presents

TME Presents: Host Nation Compliance—What Does It Really Mean? 

(1 PDH)

POC: Nicole Mathews

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"Two decades ago, I managed a project at a U.S. Navy satellite communications station in Italy. Following the construction of two terminals, I was tasked to obtain transmission licenses from the Ministry of Communications. Because these were for military use, the request was passed to the Ministry of Defense. To our surprise, the Italian Ministry of Defense had no knowledge of the C-band and Ku-band terminals we had constructed. Worse yet, they had no record of the satellite communication station’s existence, even though it had been in operation since the 1950s.

 

About the same time, in Germany, U.S. Army commands were turning installations over to local governments as a result of European downsizing. German governments quickly discovered that buildings on American-operated military bases were built to U.S. standards and codes. Who was going to pay the multi-millions it would take to bring these facilities up to host nation compliance?

 

Combined, these almost simultaneous situations changed the face of Department of Defense construction in the European theater—resulting in new, host nation approval commissions and compliance regulations."

-Excerpted from "Host Nation Compliance in the European Theater," July-August 2017 TME 


What host nation compliance really means is currently not clear among many military commands. It requires comprehensive, written guidance that can be passed-down to incumbent personnel.  Both government and industry must be open to the fact that local laws take ultimate priority, meaning compromise in materials, design and construction methodologies may have to be made.  Only when everyone is educated and these realities are fully embraced can host nation compliance be met.

International business expert Michael Sedge, of Michael-Bruno LLC, will dive deeper into this topic he wrote about in the July-Aug 2017 issue of TME, examining the challenges that engineers and construction contractors face overseas when working on U.S. government projects. Challenged with the short and what seems to be simple clause to every RFP, “Contractor shall comply with all host nation requirements,” adds a few extra levels of extra complexity to every project. What does “host nation compliance” really mean anyway, and how can you ensure that you meet these requirements when working abroad?

 

Register today and learn from Sedge's experience working abroad on a U.S. Navy satellite communications station in Italy and dozens of other U.S. government projects overseas.


Michael Sedge

Michael Sedge

Biography

Objectives:

  •  Provide an overview of the challenges facing government and contractors working in international countries that require integration of host nation compliance into new construction and renovations.
  • Highlight the effects—design, construction and overall project costs—that host nation compliance have on international work.
  • Point out the downfall in government’s current interpretation of host nation compliance.
  • Utilizing real-life examples, demonstrate the dual-design and construction features of host nation compliance.

 


What host nation compliance really means is currently not clear among many military commands.  It requires comprehensive, written guidance that can be passed-down to incumbent personnel.  Both government and industry must be open to the fact that local laws take ultimate priority, meaning compromise in materials, design and construction methodologies may have to be made.  Only when everyone is educated and these realities are fully embraced can host nation compliance be met.
Webinar: International Host Nation Compliance—What Does It Really Mean?
Start Date/Time:
Tuesday, August 29, 2017 1:00 PM
End Date/Time:
Tuesday, August 29, 2017 2:00 PM